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Glenbrook

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Overview






Please note

eOceanic has been made aware of this haven. We are looking for a sailor with first-hand experience to provide their direct personal insights so that we may complete our write up. In advance of this we have posted these preliminary research notes. Do you know this location? Please contact us or click the 'Report a Mistake or Omission' button below to help share this location with the sailing community.


Glenbrook, is a village between Passage West and Monkstown, within Cork's extensive natural harbour, in County Cork on the south coast of Ireland.

Glenbrook, is a village between Passage West and Monkstown, within Cork's extensive natural harbour, in County Cork on the south coast of Ireland.

Situated in the upper reaches of Cork's Lower Harbour, and in a sheltered part of the river, the anchorage offers good shelter and a straightforward access through Cork Harbour in all reasonable conditions. Cork Harbour is one of the most easily approached, well marked and safest natural harbours in the world.
Please note

Although the Lower Harbour is very well marked for night navigation, owing to Cobh's lights and the vast amount of markers, first time visitors should prefer a day entry as it may prove challenging at night.




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Keyfacts for Glenbrook



Last modified
May 4th 2018

Summary

A completely protected location with safe access.

Facilities
Top up fuel available in the area via jerry cansShop with basic provisions availableMini-supermarket or supermarket availableSlipway availableHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaDoctor or hospital in the areaPharmacy in the areaMarine engineering services available in the areaElectronics or electronic repair available in the areaBus service available in the areaTrain or tram service available in the areaRegional or international airport within 25 kilometres


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationSet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Note: could be two hours or more from the main waterwaysNote: strong tides or currents in the area that require consideration



HM  +353 21 4273125      info@portofcork.ie      Ch.12 14 & 16
Position and approaches
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Haven position

51° 51.572' N, 008° 19.901' W

This is the position at the ferry slipway at Glenbrook.

What is the initial fix?

The following Cork Harbour initial will set up a final approach:
51° 46.580' N, 008° 15.460' W
This waypoint is a mile out from the entrance and near the Outflow Marker Fl(Y) 20s. It is set on the alignment of 354° (T) of the Dogsnose leading lights that are situated on the east side of Cork Harbour entrance. This waypoint sets up an east channel approach but a vessel may alter course to and enter via the west channel.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southeastern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Rosslare Harbour to Cork Harbour Route location. Details for vessels approaching from the southwest are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Cork Harbour to Mizen Head Route location. The run up the Lower Harbour to Cobh Road is best described in the Cork City Marina Click to view haven entry.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Glenbrook for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Cork Harbour Marina - 0.6 miles S
  2. Cobh - 0.9 miles ESE
  3. Spike Island - 1.2 miles SE
  4. Cuskinny - 1.5 miles E
  5. Drake’s Pool - 2 miles S
  6. Crosshaven - 2.1 miles SSE
  7. White Bay - 2.7 miles SE
  8. East Ferry Marina - 2.7 miles E
  9. Aghada - 2.9 miles E
  10. Northeast of Great Island - 3 miles ENE
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Cork Harbour Marina - 0.6 miles S
  2. Cobh - 0.9 miles ESE
  3. Spike Island - 1.2 miles SE
  4. Cuskinny - 1.5 miles E
  5. Drake’s Pool - 2 miles S
  6. Crosshaven - 2.1 miles SSE
  7. White Bay - 2.7 miles SE
  8. East Ferry Marina - 2.7 miles E
  9. Aghada - 2.9 miles E
  10. Northeast of Great Island - 3 miles ENE
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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How to get in?


Glenbrook is the best anchorage in West Passage, the narrow reach of the River Lee west of Great Island that continues through Lough Mahon and eventually to Cork City.

Convergance Point The run up the Lower Harbour to Cobh Road is best described in the Cork City Marina Click to view haven entry.

The West Passage is entered between the large shipbuilding yard at Rushbrook on Great Island and Monkstown on the opposite western shore, and the anchorage off Glenbrook is about 0.75 miles above Monkstown.

Between Monkstown and the shipyard there are three separate overhead power cables, but with ample clearance. Anchor in line with or very close outside the moored craft in a depth of about 3.0 metres keeping well clear of the main shipping channel, and it is essential to have a riding light showing at all times.
Please note

There is a floating dock immediately south of the shipyard and a pier extending to the deep water on the south bank east of the prominent chemical factory.



A busy cross river car and passenger ferry operates from just south of Glenbrook on the west shore to Carrigaloe to the north of Rushbrook on Great Island.


Why visit here?
Monkstown, Glenbrook, in Irish Gleann an Fheileastraim, and Passage West are three close-knit villages side by side along the regional R610 route that runs from south Cork City along the western shores of Cork Harbour to Ringaskiddy. It is hard to distinguish where Passage West ends and Glenbrook starts as they are joined together and there is no obvious border between the two, and Monkstown is a short distance further south. The towns are 19kms south of Cork City and only 6 km from the south Cork City suburbs.

Passage West, Glenbrook and Monkstown are great mooring areas and are very popular during the summer season. Monkstown Bay itself is a pleasant and safe sailing area, while being within easy reach of the marinas and restaurants at East Ferry and Crosshaven, and the open waters of Lower Cork Harbour. In suitable wind conditions, excellent sailing is to be had past Glenbrook and up towards Cork City.

There are launching facilities at Monkstown, and Glenbrook had one public slipway whilst Passage West has two slipways with pedestrian access only. There is a further excellent slipway at Ferrypoint, hidden opposite the Ferry Arms. The area has one sailing club, Monkstown Bay Sailing Club in addition to two rowing clubs. Moorings in Cork Harbour are administered by the Port of Cork. At present the area does not have visitor moorings but one of the better anchorages for visiting yachts is Glenbrook with good holding in mud.

The cross river car and passenger ferry from Glenbrook to Carrigloe takes about 4 minutes and the two ferry's can each carry 200 passengers and 27 cars, and the ferry provides easy access to Great Island and East Cork. It is only a 10 minute drive to the ferry terminal at Ringaskiddy, from where boats depart regularly for France. A regular bus service of Bus Eireann links Passage West, Glenbrook, and Monkstown to Cork City, whilst the train from Cobh to Cork City stops at Carrigloe on the other side of the West Passage channel, which means that the big city is easily accessible.

Monkstown is well known for its excellent golf course, deep sea fishing, sailing club, restaurants and pubs, whilst Passage West is an old maritime town where a visitor will sense the importance that this town assumed in times past. It is from here that Captain Roberts set out and crossed the Atlantic in the first passenger steamship “The Sirius”. A plaque along with a piece of the ship proudly commemorates this journey next to the cross-river ferry terminal at Glenbrook.

Glenbrook was originally a seaside resort and is most famous for the Turkish bath-houses and Hydro that were established there. The first baths in Glenbrook intended for use by the public were opened in 1838 and were known as the Royal Victoria Monkstown and Passage baths. When first built they comprised slipper baths, showers, and a cold plunge pool, all of which were luxuriously fitted out. It was not long before these facilities were augmented by the addition of accommodation and food. Gardens were added and a variety of outdoor activities were organised to attract and entertain visitors who lived in villages close by. But the Royal Victoria Baths were not long to remain the only bathing facilities at Glenbrook.

In 1852 Dr Timothy Curtin the well respected hydropathic and homoeopathic doctor purchased Carrigmahon House together with 13 acres of wooded and landscaped gardens with the intention of opening a hydropathic establishment close to the Royal Victoria Baths at Glenbrook. St, Ann's Hill located within a few miles of Cork city was Ireland's first hydropathic establishment and it is possible that Curtin had been part of the staff there. After lengthy problems with the heating system for the Turkish baths, the Royal Victoria Baths closed round about 1870, and the Hydro closed shortly after in 1876 following Curtins death. The old railway line, once used for ferrying visitors to the summer resort town and the Turkish baths is now a pleasant walk offering scenic vistas of Cork Harbour.


What facilities are available?
A short distance north of the ferry slipway at Glenbrook is a public slip which is accessible at high water, and from there a 10 minute walk takes the visitor to the shops and facilities at Glenbrook and Passage West; the former has small local shops and the latter more extensive shops and services including supermarkets, 2 Allied Irish Banks, Post Office, 5 Doctors, a Pharmacy and a Public Health Centre tele:021 4841628. There is a choice of bars, bistros and restaurants at both locations, and the local Bus Eirann service passses through Passage West, Glenbrook and Monkstown. Marine engine repairs are available at Passage West, and Marine electronics at Glenbrook, but the nearest chandlery is at Cork. There is a signposted scenic walk along the path of the old railway line that affords excellent views of Cork Inner Harbour, for which trail maps are available. Passage West Gardai (police) Station is situated at Ferryport which serves, Passage West, Glenbrook and Monkstown tele:4841001.


Any security concerns?
Never an issue known to have occurred at this location.


With thanks to:
inyourfootsteps.com site research. Photography with thanks to Paul Leonard, Andy Beecroft, Gerard Ahern and derekmenzies.


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Please zoom out to see the 'initial fix' for this location.
The above plots are not precise and indicative only.








About Glenbrook

Monkstown, Glenbrook, in Irish Gleann an Fheileastraim, and Passage West are three close-knit villages side by side along the regional R610 route that runs from south Cork City along the western shores of Cork Harbour to Ringaskiddy. It is hard to distinguish where Passage West ends and Glenbrook starts as they are joined together and there is no obvious border between the two, and Monkstown is a short distance further south. The towns are 19kms south of Cork City and only 6 km from the south Cork City suburbs.

Passage West, Glenbrook and Monkstown are great mooring areas and are very popular during the summer season. Monkstown Bay itself is a pleasant and safe sailing area, while being within easy reach of the marinas and restaurants at East Ferry and Crosshaven, and the open waters of Lower Cork Harbour. In suitable wind conditions, excellent sailing is to be had past Glenbrook and up towards Cork City.

There are launching facilities at Monkstown, and Glenbrook had one public slipway whilst Passage West has two slipways with pedestrian access only. There is a further excellent slipway at Ferrypoint, hidden opposite the Ferry Arms. The area has one sailing club, Monkstown Bay Sailing Club in addition to two rowing clubs. Moorings in Cork Harbour are administered by the Port of Cork. At present the area does not have visitor moorings but one of the better anchorages for visiting yachts is Glenbrook with good holding in mud.

The cross river car and passenger ferry from Glenbrook to Carrigloe takes about 4 minutes and the two ferry's can each carry 200 passengers and 27 cars, and the ferry provides easy access to Great Island and East Cork. It is only a 10 minute drive to the ferry terminal at Ringaskiddy, from where boats depart regularly for France. A regular bus service of Bus Eireann links Passage West, Glenbrook, and Monkstown to Cork City, whilst the train from Cobh to Cork City stops at Carrigloe on the other side of the West Passage channel, which means that the big city is easily accessible.

Monkstown is well known for its excellent golf course, deep sea fishing, sailing club, restaurants and pubs, whilst Passage West is an old maritime town where a visitor will sense the importance that this town assumed in times past. It is from here that Captain Roberts set out and crossed the Atlantic in the first passenger steamship “The Sirius”. A plaque along with a piece of the ship proudly commemorates this journey next to the cross-river ferry terminal at Glenbrook.

Glenbrook was originally a seaside resort and is most famous for the Turkish bath-houses and Hydro that were established there. The first baths in Glenbrook intended for use by the public were opened in 1838 and were known as the Royal Victoria Monkstown and Passage baths. When first built they comprised slipper baths, showers, and a cold plunge pool, all of which were luxuriously fitted out. It was not long before these facilities were augmented by the addition of accommodation and food. Gardens were added and a variety of outdoor activities were organised to attract and entertain visitors who lived in villages close by. But the Royal Victoria Baths were not long to remain the only bathing facilities at Glenbrook.

In 1852 Dr Timothy Curtin the well respected hydropathic and homoeopathic doctor purchased Carrigmahon House together with 13 acres of wooded and landscaped gardens with the intention of opening a hydropathic establishment close to the Royal Victoria Baths at Glenbrook. St, Ann's Hill located within a few miles of Cork city was Ireland's first hydropathic establishment and it is possible that Curtin had been part of the staff there. After lengthy problems with the heating system for the Turkish baths, the Royal Victoria Baths closed round about 1870, and the Hydro closed shortly after in 1876 following Curtins death. The old railway line, once used for ferrying visitors to the summer resort town and the Turkish baths is now a pleasant walk offering scenic vistas of Cork Harbour.

Other options in this area


Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Alternatively here are the ten nearest havens available in picture view:
Coastal clockwise:
Cork Harbour Marina - 0.6 miles S
Spike Island - 1.2 miles SE
Drake’s Pool - 2 miles S
Crosshaven - 2.1 miles SSE
Ringabella Bay - 3.4 miles SSE
Coastal anti-clockwise:
Cork City Marina - 3.3 miles WNW
Cobh - 0.9 miles ESE
Cuskinny - 1.5 miles E
East Ferry Marina - 2.7 miles E
Northeast of Great Island - 3 miles ENE

Navigational pictures


These additional images feature in the 'How to get in' section of our detailed view for Glenbrook.













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