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Glandore

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Overview





Glandore Harbour is located on the southwest coast of Ireland, at the west end of Glandore Bay which is entered between Galley Head and Toe Head. More than two miles long, north to south, the harbour offers a host of anchoring opportunities in a scenic location alongside two villages.

Glandore Harbour is located on the southwest coast of Ireland, at the west end of Glandore Bay which is entered between Galley Head and Toe Head. More than two miles long, north to south, the harbour offers a host of anchoring opportunities in a scenic location alongside two villages.

Glandore offers complete protection from all winds. Although open to the south, the deep inlet provides better protection than neighbouring Castlehaven by its islands and rocks that lie in the entrance. Some roll can be experienced in the primary anchorage during developed southeasterly winds, but at these times shelter may be obtained by moving a short distance over to Union Hall. The entrance rocks appear formidable on the chart, but upon approach, access will be found to be straightforward as it is spacious, well-marked and lit for night access. This makes it highly navigable, day or night, at all points of the tide.



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Keyfacts for Glandore
Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWater available via tapGas availableTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansShop with basic provisions availableFuel by arrangement with bulk tanker providerSlipway availableShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaChandlery available in the areaMarine engineering services available in the area


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationVisitors moorings available, or possibly by club arrangementBeach or shoreline landing from a tenderJetty or a structure to assist landingSailing Club baseScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinitySet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierNote: harbour fees may be charged

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
2 metres (6.56 feet).

Approaches
4 stars: Straightforward; when unaffected by weather from difficult quadrants or tidal consideration, no overly complex dangers.
Shelter
5 stars: Complete protection; all-round shelter in all reasonable conditions.



Last modified
July 6th 2021

Summary* Restrictions apply

A completely protected location with straightforward access.

Facilities
Water hosepipe available alongsideWater available via tapGas availableTop up fuel available in the area via jerry cansShop with basic provisions availableFuel by arrangement with bulk tanker providerSlipway availableShore based toilet facilitiesShowers available in the vicinity or by arrangementHot food available in the localityPublic house or wine bar in the areaMarked or notable walks in the vicinity of this locationCashpoint or bank available in the areaPost Office in the areaChandlery available in the areaMarine engineering services available in the area


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationAnchoring locationVisitors moorings available, or possibly by club arrangementBeach or shoreline landing from a tenderJetty or a structure to assist landingSailing Club baseScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinitySet near a village or with a village in the immediate vicinityHistoric, geographic or culturally significant location; or in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierNote: harbour fees may be charged



Moorings  +353 28 33468     HM  +353 86 608 1944      Ch.06 [Glandore Harbour Master]
Position and approaches
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Haven position

51° 33.650' N, 009° 7.600' W

In the middle of the harbour approximately midway between Glandore Quay and Union Hall.

What is the initial fix?

The following Glandore initial fix will set up a final approach:
51° 32.500' N, 009° 5.500' W
This waypoint is an initial fix 500 metres east of Adams Island.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Cork Harbour to Mizen Head Route location.

  • Pass in to the east of Adam Island between it and Goat's Head.

  • Keep to the east of Eve Island.

  • Then pass to the west of the chain of marked rocks called The Dangers.


Not what you need?
Click the 'Next' and 'Previous' buttons to progress through neighbouring havens in a coastal 'clockwise' or 'anti-clockwise' sequence. Below are the ten nearest havens to Glandore for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line charted distance and bearing:
  1. Rabbit Island Sound - 1.1 miles S
  2. Squince Harbour - 1.1 miles S
  3. Blind Harbour - 1.5 miles SSW
  4. Tralong Bay - 1.5 miles E
  5. Castlehaven (Castletownshend) - 1.6 miles SW
  6. Mill Cove - 1.9 miles E
  7. Rosscarbery Inlet - 2.7 miles E
  8. Dirk Bay - 4.4 miles E
  9. Oldcourt - 4.6 miles WSW
  10. Barloge Creek (Lough Hyne) - 4.6 miles WSW
These havens are ordered by straight line charted distance and bearing, and can be reordered by compass direction or coastal sequence:
  1. Rabbit Island Sound - 1.1 miles S
  2. Squince Harbour - 1.1 miles S
  3. Blind Harbour - 1.5 miles SSW
  4. Tralong Bay - 1.5 miles E
  5. Castlehaven (Castletownshend) - 1.6 miles SW
  6. Mill Cove - 1.9 miles E
  7. Rosscarbery Inlet - 2.7 miles E
  8. Dirk Bay - 4.4 miles E
  9. Oldcourt - 4.6 miles WSW
  10. Barloge Creek (Lough Hyne) - 4.6 miles WSW
To find locations with the specific attributes you need try:

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Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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What's the story here?
Glandore Harbour
Image: Tom Vaughan


Glandore Harbour is nearly three miles long, north to south, and set in the northwest side of Glandore Bay which is entered between High Island and Galley Head, just over 6 miles to the east. It is entered between Sheela Point and Goat's Head passing two small islands, named Adam and Eve, at the southern end and mouth of the harbour, and then a chain of well-marked central dangers that show at three-quarter ebb. The village of Glandore stands in the northeast bight of the harbour, where there is a small drying pier that offers a convenient landing point. The active fishing pier of Union Hall is situated on the west side of the harbour and the village of Leap at its north end closed off by a bridge.


The stone pier at Glandore Village
Image: Michael Harpur


In all but south and southeast winds, a good anchorage can be found off of Glandore. The best anchorage is off Coosaneigh Point, 300 metres northwest of the Sunk Rock Buoy in about 3 metres of water. But this is ½ a mile away from the village pier and those who prefer to come close can anchor in 2.5 metres just outside the mooring area.


Yacht on visitor mooring off Glandore
Image: Burke Corbett


Alternatively, pick up one of the six visitor moorings off the Glandore harbour entrance provided by Glandore Harbour Yacht Club External link, contact contact Glandore Inn Landline+353 (0)28 33468/+353 (0)28 33518. Their moorings are yellow and marked visitor and charge €15.00/vessel. Payment should be made to the club or at the Glandore Inn next door.


The Old Pier at Union Hall where it is possible to dry
Image: Michael Harpur


Union Hall provides protection during south or south-easterly winds off the pier in 2.5 meters. Yachts may come alongside temporarily for short periods to use the water hose or get provisions. Overnight provided arrangements are made with the advice of the Harbour Master Landline+353 (0)28 34737, Mobile+353(0)86 6081944 or fishing vessel. Vessels that can take to the bottom can dry in the Old Quay that dries for €15.00/vessel.


How to get in?
Passing south of Galley Head
Image: Burke Corbett


Convergance Point Use Ireland’s coastal overview for Cork Harbour to Mizen Head Route location for seaward approaches. Glandore Bay lies between Shella Point and Galley Head a distance of about 5¾ miles eastward, and embraces Glandore Harbour at its west end. In addition to Glandore the bay hosts some small inlets, and the separately covered Tralong Bay Click to view haven, Mill Cove Click to view haven and Rosscarbery Bay Click to view haven. The west half of its north shore consists of steep barren cliffs rising to considerable hills inland.


Eastern Approach Vessels approaching from the east will find the eastern extremity of Glandore Bay unmistakably marked by the 37 metres high Galley Head. Appearing like an island, from both west and east it has a prominent lighthouse, a 21-metre high white tower, standing on the extremity of the headland. It also has the ruin of Dundeady Castle can be seen on the low neck that connects it with the mainland.

Galley Head – lighthouse Fl (5) 20s 53m 23M position: 51°31.798'N, 008°57.210'W


Galley Head with Doolic Rock as seen from the east
Image: Burke Corbett


A ½ mile southwest of Galley Head, and awash at high water, is the head's principal danger of Doolic Rock. The rock is steep-to on the north and east, but foul ground extends 300 metres to the southwest of it. It is therefore advisable to keep at least ½ a mile south of the Galley Head.
Please note

Wind against tide situations develops heavy seas close to the head. Strong currents are experienced off Galley Head and Doolic Rock with the ebb tide setting onto the rock with great velocity. In these circumstances, it is advisable that a vessel stays offshore.



Rosscarbery Cathedral spire just open of Creggan Point
Image: Burke Corbett


In good weather, leisure craft can use the channel between Doolic Rock and Galley Head. There is a transit that clears both Cloghna Rock, in Glandore Bay, and Doolic Rock. This is a line of bearing of 320°T of the pointed spire of Rosscarbery Cathedral just open of Creggan Point situated 1 mile to the southeast of the cathedral, and it leads between the Doolic Rock and Galley Head in from 16 to 20 metres of water.

Passing north of Doolic Rock on transit
Image: Burke Corbett


The same transit may be used to safely pass to the southwest of Cloghna Rock, the outmost danger of Rosscarbery Bay. Situated 1½ miles out from the shore in front of Long Strand it is a pinnacle rock that is steep to all-round and has 0.9 metres LAT of water over it.


Rabbit Island with High and Low Islands in the backdrop
Image: Michael Harpur


Western Approach Vessels approaching from the west will find High Island, with its elevation of 46 metres is readily identifiable. The rock is situated ¾ of a mile south-southwest from Rabbit Island and midway between Glandore Harbour and Castle Haven. It is the largest of a cluster of rocks and islets and is steep-to to the south and east, but the group must not be approached too closely from any other side. Vessels are advised to pass to the south of High Island for simplicity.


The outlying Belly Rock breaking
Image: Michael Harpur


Coastal sailors and the more adventurous may, however, cut in through Big Sound between High and Low islands and the shore. The danger with the Big Sound passage is the very dangerous outlying Belly Rock located in the middle of the fairway. Awash at low water springs and drying to 0.4 meters it lies 300 metres to the south of the rocks that extend from the west end of Rabbit Island.

Belly Rock – unmarked, position: 51° 31.475'N, 009° 07.165'W


The conspicuous ruined tower on Horse Island
Image: Burke Corbett


Apart from Belly Rock, Big Sound otherwise presents a clear passage. Keeping the north shoreline of Low Island in line astern with the ruined tower on Horse Island, 2 miles away on about bearing 253° T, keeps a vessel well south of Belly Rock whilst exiting the sound.


The entrance to Glandore Harbour east-northeast of Rabbit Island
Image: Michael Harpur


Just under 1 mile to the north by northeast of High and Low Islands is Rabbit Island that forms the east shore of the small harbour of Squince Click to view haven and provides Rabbit Island Click to view haven anchorage itself on its mainland side. With Rabbit Island abrest Glandore Harbour will open.


Glandore Harbour as seen from the southwest
Image: Michael Harpur


Initial fix location The harbour will have long since opened on the approach to the initial fix. The bluff 79-metre high Goat’s Head will be on the eastern shore, with an old telegraph tower, standing on its cliffs.


The bluff 79-metre high Goat’s Head
Image: Burke Corbett


The low lying Sheela Point will be seen on the west side of the entrance and the 27 metres high Adam Island a ¼ of a mile off Sheela Point in the entrance.


Adam Island, Sheela Point seen from the north, with Rabbit Island and High
Island in the backdrop

Image: Michael Harpur


The 7 meters high Eve Island, should also be visible ½ a mile above Adam Island. After this, The Dangers should also come into view, or more appropriately starboard marks of the area most often called 'The Perches'. This is a chain of three rocky patches that lie mid-channel about 400 metres to the north of Eve Island that marked on the western extremity to indicating the preferred channel.


Adam, Eve and The Dangers markers as seen from the head of the harbour
Image: Michael Harpur



The conventional wisdom for entering Glandore is to avoid Adam and hug Eve during the approach. More precisely stated, the preferred entrance path is to the east of Adam and Eve islands, keeping near mid-channel, then switch to the western side to pass 'The Dangers' to starboard. The initial fix sets up this approach. At night a sectored light, a steel tower standing on the western shore between Coosaneigh and Long points, shows white over the approach from the southeast, 'Red' over Adam’s Island and Eve islands and 'Green' over Grohoge Point and the Outer Danger. Oc WRG 5s 37m 7M, G 294°–304°, W 304°– 312°, R 312°– 342°.

Glandore Harbour opening around Grohoge Point inside Goat's Head
Image: Burke Corbett


From the Initial Fix, steer a course of 295° T for Eve Island passing about midway between Adam Island and Goat's Head. Foul ground extends to the north of Adam Island for a distance of 250 metres and out east for about 150 metres, hence the mantra avoid Adam. Giving Adam Island a wide berth presents little issue as the eastern channel is about a ½ mile wide with 10 to 25 metres of water.


Passing Adam
Image: Burke Corbett


Eve Island is much smaller and lies ½ a mile inside Adam Island. Eve Island is steep too and all dangers are cleared by keeping 100 metres off when rounding the island. It may be passed on either side but the east side is the preferred option. This avoids sunken rocks that narrow the channel on the western side laying some distance out from the harbour’s western shore abreast of Eve Island. The eastern side has, by comparison, the widest and most direct channel.


Passing Eve
Image: Burke Corbett


On passing Eve Island turn to the west, port, on a bearing of approximately 320°T, to switch to the better path on the western side of The Dangers, and hence the rounding and hug Eve part of the mantra.


Preparing to pass the dangers to starboard
Image: Burke Corbett


The Dangers show at three-quarter ebb. They are all steep-to with deep water between them and have a channel on either side, both with more than 6 metres of water, although the western side is the preferred choice.


The Dangers, Eve and Adam as seen from northwest
Image: European Drones External link


This first, or 'Outer Danger', marker is positioned on the west side of the rocky section and has a green triangle top mark Fl (2+ 1) G.10s 4M. It also has a non-IALA mark on its eastern side that marks the opposite end of what is in effect one rock so do not be tempted to pass between these two marks. The 250-metre gap between Long Point on the west shore, and the green perch marker will be clearly visible and it is safe to proceed through the middle of the gap. Once between Long Point and the 'Outer Danger' marker steer about 330°T into the harbour to pass midway between the western shore and the remaining dangers.

The 'Middle Danger' and the 'Inner Danger' are each marked by one green perch each with a triangle topmark and are passed on their western side - to starboard. Finally, there is Sunk Rock, with 1 metre of water over it about 200 metres north of the Inner Danger, that is marked by a lit buoy Fl.G.5s.

Once past Sunk Rock the main harbour opens up and the speed limit is 3kn. When Union Hall Pier will be seen around Coosaneigh Point, located 1¼ miles north by northwest of Sheela Point, a vessel will be to the north of The Dangers.


Local moorings outside of Glandore Stone Pier
Image: Michael Harpur


Haven location The best anchorage is off Coosaneigh Point, 300 metres northwest of the Sunk Rock Buoy in about 3 metres of water. Tuck in as tight to the shore as possible to avoid impede fishing vessels making their way into Union Quay and it is vital that a night light is carried.

If easier access to the village is required move closer to Glandore Harbour. The area surrounding the harbour has a host of moorings and it is best to anchor close outside these.
Please note

Do not anchor so far out as to be in the path of the fishing vessels making their way to Union Hall. The vessels tend to follow the deeper water channel before turning for the harbour so any vessel anchored well out could obstruct their path. More importantly, at night it will be difficult for the fishing vessel to so see a yacht's anchor light when set against the shore lights of Glandore.




The floating pontoon at the head of Glandore Pier
Image: Michael Harpur


Glandore village provides excellent dinghy access to the village via its floating pontoon near the head of the stone quay.


Union Hall as seen from Glandore
Image: Michael Harpur


If further protection is required a more sheltered anchorage in mud will be found 200 metres north of Union Hall’s Quay.

Union Hall Quay with its village in the backdrop
Image: John Finn


Although there a dredged approach channel and an area of maintained depth of 2.5 metres LAT on the charts for Union Hall there are no channel marks for this. Vessels making for Union Hall should keep on course for the bay opposite Glandore for at least 300 metres north of Coosaneigh Point to avoid a mud bank that extends from the shore and keep an eye to the sounder.


Fishing boats alongside at Union Quay
Image: Michael Harpur


Union Hall Quay is 150 metres long and has depths of about 3 metres alongside. Via arrangement, it may be possible to come alongside a fishing boat. Alternatively, dry out by the old pier.


Union Hall's drying Old Pier
Image: Michael Harpur


Additional Glandore Notes

  • • There is no external VHF coverage in Glandore or Union Hall for a vessel with an antenna positioned lower than 4 metres. Vessels with a 10-metre high antenna will find external reception possible, if poor. Reception may prove more reliable for vessels with antennas mounted higher than this.

  • • If beating up the harbour, the shores must be approached with caution, as they are foul out to some distance.

  • • If approaching from the West it is just as possible to take a western cut into the harbour. This is by taking the 400 metres wide western pass between Adam Island and Sheela Point. From there steer to pass close to the east of Eve Island, to avoid a shallow patch with less than 1 metre located off the western shore about 300 metres west of Eve Island. Vessels taking a western approach should make note of Sheela's Rock, a reef which extends almost 200 metres eastward from Sheela Point and dries to 1.2 metres.

  • •Likewise, there is a usable fairway on either side of The Dangers. In proceeding through the passage to the east of The Dangers, keep at least 100 metres off of the eastern shore.



Why visit here?
Glandore derives its name from one of two Irish expressions, either Cuan D'Ór, meaning 'harbour of the gold', or Cuan Daire, meaning 'harbour of oak'. It is uncertain which the name came from, but either way, the name has come to describe the village, harbour and outer bay. Union Hall, opposite Glandore, was named after the 1801 Act of Union, which abolished the separate Irish parliament.


Drombeg Stone Circle
Image: Tourism Ireland


Due to its location, Glandore is the site of one of the earlier settlements of this area of the Cork coastline. Evidence of this can be at its famous Drombeg Stone Circle situated 2.4 km east of Glandore on a natural terrace overlooking a shallow valley with the Atlantic visible to the south. Also known as The Druid's Altar, Drombeg dates back to about 150 BC, this circle of 17 standing stones is 9.5 metres in diameter. It is a Recumbent Stone Circle, that consists of 17 stones incorporating a large monolith, known as a recumbent, lying on its side. At the winter solstice, the rays of the setting sun fall on the flat altar stone which faces the entrance to the circle, marked by two upright stones. Two of the stones are portal stones that would have had a pot at its centre containing the cremated remains of a young body.


Drombeg Stone Circle
Image: Tourism Ireland


The Drombeg Stone Circle is the finest of the many stone circles in County Cork and just a 25-minute walk from Glandore village and not far off the main road. The site is well preserved and one of the most visited megalithic sites in Ireland. It is now protected under the National Monuments Act and the area of the circle has been covered in gravel to protect it from the volume of visitors. Nearby is a small stream with a Stone Age cooking pit 'fulacht fiadh'. A fire was made in the hearth and hot stones from the fire were dropped into the cooking pit to heat the water. Once the water boiled, meat was added, usually, venison that was hunted in the area.


Glandore's 18th-Century harbour
Image: Michael Harpur


After the Norman Conquest, in 1215, the head of the Barretts of Munster, a Cambro-Norman family, built two forts here. The first fortress on the site of what is now Kilfinnan Castle overlooking the harbour. This was a 'mote'-like site, and perhaps dug out the gullies to enhance this. Originally known as Cloch an tsraid baile 'the stone fortress of the street town'. They subsequently built Castle Eyre or Ivor, around 1250, close to Union Hall on the edge of a rocky mound overlooking Lake Cluhir. But they could not holdout against the Irish chieftain family, the O'Donovans, and both fortresses were destroyed in 1260.


The Anglican Church of Ireland overlooking Glandore pier
Image: Michael Harpur


For centuries thereafter Glandore was closely associated with the O'Donovans. The O'Donovans also built Raheen Castle, circa 1580, which is situated on the east bank of Glandore Harbour on the opposite side to Castletownsend. The full name of the harbour village of Leap is 'O'Donovan's Leap', derived from the story of an O'Donovan, who was being pursued by English soldiers but escaped by jumping across a ravine at the bottom of the village. The Gaelic mastery finally came to an end after the 1601 Battle of Kinsale when the Irish chieftains of West Cork, the four strongest being O’Donovan, O’Driscoll, O’Mahony and O’Sullivan, lost most of their territory.


The pretty Anglican Church of Ireland
Image: Michael Harpur


Glandore's pretty stone pier and wall were built upon a rock outcrop in the first half of the 19th-century. The beautiful little Anglican Church of Ireland, overlooking it, one of the most conspicuous of Glandore's historic buildings, dates back to this time. Built on a rock ledge overlooking the bay it offers spectacular views across the water. Access to the Church grounds and the Church is through an archway, a kind of mini-tunnel, hewn through the solid rock that is part of the ledge.
Soon after its construction, in 1830, the village hosted West Cork’s first regatta. Glandore was chosen not just for the convenient landing it provided but for the perfect amphitheatre, its elevated surrounds made a for spectator viewing.


The view over the harbour from the road beneath the church
Image: Michael Harpur


Today the villages Glandore and Union Hall, are flourishing in their own distinctive ways. The very much more workaday Union Hall is the home port of a thriving fishing fleet of 30 vessels. Glandore, by contrast, is a magnet for tourists, yachts and pleasure craft in the summer. They are drawn to the almost perfect sailing harbour and the surrounding area that is one of the most beautiful areas in West Cork. Although Union Hall tends to fall beneath the picture-perfect shadow of Glandore, it should be considered a useful sailing destination as it provides much more resources for a cruising vessel.


Union Hall's busy quays
Image: Michael Harpur


Sailing in the harbour is fostered by the highly active Glandore Harbour Yacht Club. The yacht club's official headquarters is next to the Glandore Inn, located just a few yards from the pier in Glandore village.


The Glandore Inn
Image: Tourism Ireland


On odd years and during the second week of July, the club hosts the biannual 'Glandore Classic Regatta' that takes place over the space of a week. Boats from all over the country come to participate in this event. The parade of sail and the closing fireworks display are now a must-see on the sailing calendar. An annual regatta also takes place during the third weekend of August.


Morning view anchored off Glandore
Image: Ger Hore


From a boating perspective, Glandore has it all. The scenery around the bay is very picturesque and the harbour is both spacious and secure, offering an excellent anchorage. Glandore's stone quay and village are very pretty and along with the two other villages in the harbour offering provisions, dining and good pubs. The wonderful surrounding countryside is steeped in historical interest and if you do not want to go by foot there are great day-trips to the coves on either side of the harbour entrance where it is also possible to spend a night. All the time passing Adam and Eve and their dangers, that both protect the harbour and provide a little interesting pilotage. So, in coastal cruising terms, the true Garden of Eden experience.


What facilities are available?
The harbour has the village of Leap at the north end, and Union Hall on the west side. Water is available on Glandore & Union Hall piers, but Union Hall is the best destination for supplies as it includes a chandlery. No fuel is available, but it can be arranged if quantity warrants a road tanker to be sent. There is a good shop situated in Union Hall that provides a wide range of essentials and fine foods plus gas, off-licence, ATM etc. The custodians are most helpful and are delighted to offer advice to visiting sailors with regard to divers, cranes, breakdown/engine repairs/diesel etc. There is an active and welcoming yacht club in Glandore village, which also has several pubs, serving beer, food, and very often traditional music can be found here. Glandore is located about an hour's drive west of Cork city.


Any security concerns?
Never a security issue known to have occurred at Glandore or Union Hall.


With thanks to:
Burke Corbett, Gusserane, New Ross, Co. Wexford.







Glandore Aerial



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