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Blind Harbour

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Overview





Blind Harbour is a small sea inlet on the southwest coast of Ireland, it is approximately half a mile east of the mouth of Castlehaven and two and half nautical miles west of Glandore, in Co. Cork. It offers an anchorage in a remote and secluded location with excellent holding.

The harbour provides a good anchorage in all but southerly component conditions to which the inlet is exposed. Shallower draft vessels may, however, find shelter here from almost all conditions. On the whole, the entrance channel provides a measure of southerly protection, and vessels that can take to more shallow waters can progress in and around corners at the head of the inlet which provides protection from almost any reasonable condition. Although there are no marks, daylight access is straightforward as the inlet’s entrance has plenty of water and is clear of dangers.
Please note

Please note it would be dangerous to be on anchor here if the wind was to suddenly turn to the south and be accompanied by a swell. If this were to happen it would be very difficult for a sailing vessel to beat out of Blind Harbour.




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Keyfacts for Blind Harbour
Facilities
Slipway available


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationJetty or a structure to assist landingQuick and easy access from open waterScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierDANGER: Subject to conditions that could trap and destroy a vessel

Protected sectors

Current wind over the protected quadrants
Minimum depth
2 metres (6.56 feet).

Approaches
4 stars: Straightforward; when unaffected by weather from difficult quadrants or tidal consideration, no overly complex dangers.
Shelter
4 stars: Good; assured night's sleep except from specific quarters.



Last modified
May 8th 2018

Summary* Restrictions apply

A good location with straightforward access.

Facilities
Slipway available


Nature
No fees for anchoring or berthing in this locationRemote or quiet secluded locationAnchoring locationJetty or a structure to assist landingQuick and easy access from open waterScenic location or scenic location in the immediate vicinity

Considerations
Restriction: shallow, drying or partially drying pierDANGER: Subject to conditions that could trap and destroy a vessel



Position and approaches
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Haven position

51° 31.530' N, 009° 9.340' W

This waypoint is approximately three quarters of a mile due south of the entrance on the 25 metre contour. A course of due north from here will lead into the entrance.


What are the key points of the approach?

Offshore details are available in southwestern Ireland’s Coastal Overview for Cork Harbour to Mizen Head Route location.


Not what you need?
Try our Advanced Havens Search tool to find locations with the specific attributes you need, or click the 'Next', coastal clockwise, or 'Previous', coastal anti-clockwise, buttons to progress through neighbouring havens. Below are the ten nearest havens to Blind Harbour for your convenience.
Ten nearest havens by straight line distance
  1. Castlehaven (Castletownshend) - 0.3 miles W
  2. Squince Harbour - 0.6 miles ENE
  3. Rabbit Island - 0.8 miles ENE
  4. Glandore - 1.5 miles NNE
  5. Tralong Bay - 2.4 miles ENE
  6. Mill Cove - 2.9 miles ENE
  7. Barloge Creek (Lough Hyne) - 3.4 miles WSW
  8. Rosscarbery Bay - 3.6 miles ENE
  9. Oldcourt - 3.8 miles W
  10. Reena Dhuna - 4.9 miles W
Ten nearest havens by straight line distance
  1. Castlehaven (Castletownshend) - 0.3 miles W
  2. Squince Harbour - 0.6 miles ENE
  3. Rabbit Island - 0.8 miles ENE
  4. Glandore - 1.5 miles NNE
  5. Tralong Bay - 2.4 miles ENE
  6. Mill Cove - 2.9 miles ENE
  7. Barloge Creek (Lough Hyne) - 3.4 miles WSW
  8. Rosscarbery Bay - 3.6 miles ENE
  9. Oldcourt - 3.8 miles W
  10. Reena Dhuna - 4.9 miles W
Alternatively the above can be ordered by compass direction or coastal sequence


Chart
Please use our integrated Navionics chart to appraise the haven and its approaches. Navionics charts feature in premier plotters from B&G, Raymarine, Magellan and are also available on tablets. Open the chart in a larger viewing area by clicking the expand to 'new tab' or the 'full screen' option.

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How to get in?
The small sea inlet of Blind Harbour opens approximately half a mile east-northeast of the mouth of Castle Haven and two and half nautical miles east of Glandore. It is partially covered to the southeast by a ragged cluster of rocks called Low and High Island a distance of a mile off, and open to the south.

Convergance Point Vessels moving in the area between, Glandore, Blind Harbour and Castlehaven, and particularly those using ‘Big Sound’ that is located between Low & High Islands and the mainland, should read the closer approaches notes in the Castlehaven, (Castletownshend) Click to view haven entry that discuss this area.

Initial fix location From the initial fix steer a course of due north toward the entrance. This course passes to the west of High and Low Islands and has no obstructions. These islands are highly visible, respectively 46 metres and 10 metres high. The island cluster’s western outliers, called the Seal Rocks, will be passed about half a mile to starboard on a southerly approach from the initial fix.



Once the inlet entrance has been identified proceed up its quarter of a mile long neck and into the inner bay. Depths of 15 metres will be found at the entrance, decreasing to 8.8 metres, about two-thirds of the way up, and then at the top end 2.8 metres. Where the inner bay starts to open out it shelves gradually to 1.5 metres and then continues to shallow onto the north shore.

Haven location Anchor according to draft in the inner bay. The shallower the draft required the more a vessel has the freedom to position itself. Two metres is available in the middle of the neck at the head of the channel at low water. However the sandy, gradually shelving bay makes it very easy for the average cruising vessel to feel around for the right depth in and around the shoulders of the inner bay. On neaps most cruising boats would have a lot of scope to find an ideal location to anchor around the corners. Excellent clay and sand holding will be found throughout the inlet.

Land at the small boat pier and slip at the head of the harbour or alternatively at a second slip on the eastern recess of the inner bay. The boat harbour will be seen on entry as it is directly in-line-of-sight from the entrance channel. Do not be drawn into approaching the boat harbour. There is not enough water to support a yacht on the north side of the inner bay but vessels that can take to the hard may, of course, proceed to come alongside there on a high tide.
Please note

A shallow draft vessel could be comfortably left unattended for a few days around the corners of the bay. This would not be the case for deeper draft vessels that would be limited to the head of the channel and exposed to the south.




Why visit here?
Blind Harbour is an excellent anchoring location and very pretty. It does not have a perfect white sand beach as its shores are comprised of a mixture of sand and clay making its strand dark. Apart from that, it is truly a lovely location and very much off the beaten path.

For vessels on a passage, it offers quick access along with solid holding in that sand and clay base. This makes it an ideal location to drop into for a lunch break or a quiet night of solitude in a lovely secluded bay.


What facilities are available?
There is nothing in Blind Harbour except for a small boat pier and slip to land a dinghy against, and similar comments apply to the further slip in the eastern recess of the inner bay.


Any security concerns?
Never an issue known to have occurred to a vessel on anchor in Blind Harbour.


With thanks to:
Burke Corbett, Gusserane, New Ross, Co. Wexford. Photography with thanks to Burke Corbett.


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Please note eOceanic makes no guarantee of the validity of this information, we have not visited this haven and do not have first-hand experience to qualify the data. Although the contributors are vetted by peer review as practised authorities, they are in no way, whatsoever, responsible for the accuracy of their contributions. It is essential that you thoroughly check the accuracy and suitability for your vessel of any waypoints offered in any context plus the precision of your GPS. Any data provided on this page is entirely used at your own risk and you must read our legal page if you view data on this site. Free to use sea charts courtesy of Navionics.